Contents

In doing the research for the article I learned a few things about the “other” properties of magnified optics. Thanks to Shawn for hosting my post: A Different Look at Rifle Optics Share: Google Twitter Facebook Pinterest Reddit More Tumblr LinkedIn Pocket Email Print. .

This Weeks Post Over at www.looserounds.com

This Weeks Post Over at www.looserounds.comIn doing the research for the article I learned a few things about the “other” properties of magnified optics. Thanks to Shawn for hosting my post: A Different Look at Rifle Optics Share: Google Twitter Facebook Pinterest Reddit More Tumblr LinkedIn Pocket Email Print

41 Essential Items For Sheltering in Place

41 Essential Items For Sheltering in Place

Believe it or not, the idea of sheltering in place can be slightly unnerving. Afterall, human beings are social creatures and most of us are out and about daily. Whether that be going to work, running errands, going to appointments, or just taking a nice walk. So, I can see how the idea of having to stay in one location can seem uncomfortable. However, there is one main reason I have found that people are scared about sheltering in place. They do not know what they need. Luckily, most of the items on the list below are probably already in your home. You just may need to adjust the quantity. I have created lists like this in the past for myself, and I wanted to take another shot at it to see if anything has changed. I am going to challenge myself, and you, to come up with a list of 41 essential items for sheltering in place for 30 days. Let’s go! Quick Navigation 41 Essential Items For Bugging In Wrap Up 41 Essential Items For Bugging In Water. Critical to life and most of us utterly take it for granted. But considering we can only live three days (plus or minus given the conditions) without it, I consider it a priority item. A good rule of thumb is one gallon per person per day for drinking. Do yourself a favor and have some extra water stored away in appropriate containers just in case the tap stops running. Ideally though having an abundant and renewable resource for water is important. To build such a device, you should watch this video presentation . Water filters. The tap may still be running but other factors can affect whether the water is still safe to drink. This is when having methods to clean water can become a lifesaver. Add in a few filters like the Lifestraw or Sawyer Mini to help clean your drinking water. Food . Disregarding what foods to store, walk into your kitchen, and look through your pantry and refrigerator. Do you have enough food to last thirty days? If you answered yes, then good for you. If you answered no, then start putting away extra items now. One recommendation would be to store up on items that do not need refrigeration or a power source for cooking, such as canned goods. Or if you just want to be prepped, you can buy survival food kits . Manual Can Opener. This will be important to have should the power go out or the canned goods do not have the easy-open tabs. Coffee/Vices. Okay, so, can you live without coffee? Sure. But I have personally known people that have blinding, migraine level headaches from caffeine withdrawal. Whatever your poison is, it might be worth having some extra on hand. Pet Food. Many of us view our pets as members of our family. It only makes sense then that there should be enough supplies for them as well. First Aid. How else are you going to take care of minor cuts, scrapes, burns, blisters, etc.? The kit does not need to be expensive or extensive but make sure its contents reflect your skill level. Check our our pre-made first aid kits . Prescription medications. More and more people are taking some form of prescription medication for their health. Be sure to always refill your prescription as soon possible so you always have enough on hand. General medications. Things like aspirin, Tylenol, and allergy pills just to name a few. While some of these medications may not be critical to your health, alleviating aches and pains can go a long way in being more comfortable. Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) Having a healthy supply of latex gloves, face masks, eye protection, earplugs, skin protection, and heavy-duty gloves can help you deal with the unknown. If you are wanting to buy face masks, we highly recommend this one . Hand soap. Washing your hands is one of the cheapest, most effective means of stopping the spread of germs. Be sure to load up on a couple of extra bars. Body Soap. Have extra to keep yourself fresh and clean. Toothpaste. Oral hygiene is extremely important for general health. I suggest having at least one extra tube of paste and a toothbrush on hand. Do not forget to floss! Feminine Hygiene Products. Be sure you have what you need in this department. Baby Supplies. Diapers, wipes, formula, special foods, and special medications. Make sure the littles are covered. Dish Soap. Unless you are willing to let your dirty dishes pile up for the duration it is a good idea to have enough dish soap on hand. Bleach. It is a good disinfectant and can be used to help purify water. Make sure it is unscented. Disposable plates/utensils . Of course, if you do not want to have to clean dishes than this is a cheap alternative . Also, they are useful if the water is not available for cleaning. Laundry detergent. Speaking of letting stinky items pile up, do not forget to have enough detergent on hand to keep your clothes clean. Alternative Clothes Washing Method. What if the power goes out or the washing machine breaks? Plan for an alternative method for washing clothes. Something like the Wander Wash or a five-gallon bucket with a plunger Trash Bags. Other than keeping our smelly trash contained, trash bags have a multitude of other uses. Candles . Handy to have if the lights go out. I suggest Sterno emergency candles because they have an extremely long burn time. Lighter and Matches . Going to need these to light those candles. Batteries. With the amount of electronic gear we have these days, it is always a good idea to have extra batteries on hand. Flashlight . Always useful to find your way in the dark. Think about purchasing a solar-powered or rechargeable one so you can ditch the extra batteries. We highly recommend the Procharge Survival Flashlight (solar powered) or the EVATAC Flashlight . Radio. Not only are good tunes a plus, but a radio will provide a means of knowing what is going on outside . I would suggest one that is rechargeable, solar-powered, or of the hand crank variety. Otherwise, make sure you have enough batteries. Check out our HAM radio products that we recommend. Blankets and Fans. Modern buildings rely heavily on air conditioning and heaters to regulate indoor temperatures. Should these go out, have a few fans on hand for hot weather and heavy blankets for cold weather for regulating body temperature. Solar Charger. Its always nice to have an alternative energy source in case the power goes out. I have used solar chargers by Sunjack and they work great for charging small devices and a laptop. Generator. If you are in the position to have one of these, I highly recommend one but do your research first. Make sure you have a plan in place to run it outside or a means of venting it. Fuel. Extra fuel for a vehicle, cooking sources, or other devices you deem essential. Hand Tools. Have some of the basics on hand to fix or adjust items as needed such as a screwdriver, pliers, wrenches, and hammer. Pliers and wrench are especially important should you need to turn off utilities. Extra Hardware. You never know when you might need a nail, screw, or bolt. Most big box stores carry kits of assorted hardware that are quite affordable. Duct Tape. How does the old saying go? If you cannot fix it with duct tape, then it cannot be fixed. Seriously though, duct tape has a million uses so make sure you have some. Plastic Sheeting. It has many uses including covering windows, waterproofing, and sanitation. Plastic Bags. I always keep the cache of plastic shopping bags in the house. They have a variety of uses such as a trash bag, keeping items organized, and other sanitation purposes. Fire Extinguisher. During a shelter in place orders, certain services such as the fire department may not be available. But one of these should always be in your home regardless. Personal Protection Device. I will leave this blank but there should be something on hand that you know how to safely use if you need to protect yourself. Check out our top survival rifle choices . Important Documentation (non-digital) In case electronic resources are not available, it is a good idea to have a hard copy of the information. Include things like contact numbers, especially emergency contacts, addresses, health-related information, and emergency plans. Be sure to keep it all in a waterproof container. Stationary. Helpful in recording important information or should you need to leave a note or a warning. A small supply of paper, pens, pencils, permanent markers can be picked up super cheap . Cash. You may be asking, “what is the point of cash?” Cash is king and if you are sheltering in place then something out of the norm is going on. ATMs and banking systems might not be available. Put aside some cash just in case. Entertainment. Cabin fever is no joke. Isolation can deteriorate one’s mental health so it is important to have things around that will keep you occupied. Books, movies, hobby supplies, board games, or whatever you are into. Here is an interesting video about this topic: Wrap Up Whew! I think that is a darn good list of the basics for sheltering in place. Do not forget to personalize the above categories to your needs, that way you can have the best list possible. I am sure this list could be longer so if there are items that I forget to mention, please feel free to comment below. Other interesting articles: Top 100 Items To Disappear First First Aid Training – An Essential Survival Skill The Survival Handbook: Essential Skills for Outdoor Adventure 29 Everyday Items to Stockpile For Survival

[Review] Joe Bob Outfitters Trigger Adjuster & Kaw Valley Precision Reduced Power Springs

[Review] Joe Bob Outfitters Trigger Adjuster & Kaw Valley Precision Reduced Power Springs

Trending: Best Places to Buy Ammo Online and [Buyer's Guide] 7 Best AR-15s What’s one of the first things I always modify in a new AR-15? The trigger . Mil-spec AR-15 Trigger But what if you don’t want to swap your mil-spec one out completely? Or don’t have the funds for a full drop-in replacement? You can try Joe Bob Outfitter’s Trigger Adjuster ($14.95) combo-ed with the Kaw Valley Reduced Power Springs ($5). Trigger Adjuster The Trigger Adjuster takes the place of your normal grip screw and increases it’s length so it can move forward and take out the pre-travel in your trigger. Joe Bob Trigger Adjuster with Tools Follow the assembly rules and make sure you let the Blue Loctite (not included) dry so it stays in the correct length.  And make sure the hammer, trigger, reset, and safety all still work. Joe "Bob Trigger Adjuster" Installed Here is mine installed at the correct length which took out a lot of the sloppy pre-travel. KVP Reduced Power Spring Kaw Valley Springs Yes they are simply springs…but they are reduced power to make your trigger pull a little less as well.  Here they are installed in my lower. "Kaw Valley Reduced" Power Trigger Springs No problem with setting off primers from my recommended AR-15 ammo .  And also my harder Tula-primered reloaded rounds. Now how about reduction in trigger pull weight?  I measured an average of 6.5 lbs (ew) with my mil-spec trigger…and afterwards with the combo of adjust and spring…it became a much better 5 lb. Conclusion Do I recommend the Trigger Adjuster and Kaw Valley Reduced Power Springs ? Of course! For ~$20 bucks you can’t make your trigger much better than this. But don’t expect it to be magical either.  For that I’d recommend looking at a full drop-in set. But as one of the first few things you do to your new AR-15…you can’t go wrong.  Just be sure to follow the instructions, make sure you know how to disassemble/assemble your lower, let the Loctite dry, and make sure it works with your ammo.

Reloading Brilliant But Discontinued Cartridges

Reloading Brilliant But Discontinued Cartridges

/* custom css */.td_uid_2_5f379d8a01564_rand.td-a-rec-img { text-align: left; } .td_uid_2_5f379d8a01564_rand.td-a-rec-img img { margin: 0 auto 0 0; } The 250/3000 Savage was the first American cartridge to go 3,000 feet per second. Now it's considered one of many discontinued cartridges. There are plenty of excellent cartridges that didn’t catch on. Their lack of overall popularity doesn’t mean discontinued cartridges need to be relegated to the ash heap of history. “What am I going to do now? Do I try to buy up any and all ammunition, and only rarely use the rifle I like so much? Do I buy something more common?” Handloading is the solution. A competent handloader can revive discontinued cartridges from the brink of extinction. As long as the bullets and brass can still be purchased or made, the rifle will continue to have a long, healthy and happy life. The following are three examples of cartridges that can be easily returned to duty. The 250/3000 Savage Developed by renowned ballistician Charles Newton for the Savage Arms Co. in 1915, it was a speed demon for its day, achieving a then unheard of 3,000 fps with the 87-grain bullet. This benchmark influenced the very name of the cartridge, though it is also commonly known as the .250 Savage. It was a readily available chambering for the handy Savage 99 lever action, and was (and is) fully capable of pulling double duty on both varmints and deer-size game. The handloader can easily bring these discontinued cartridges back around. Great .257-inch-diameter bullets, weighing from 87 grains to 120 grains, are available from almost all manufacturers, and Remington still produces component brass. Loaded with a medium burn rate powder such as IMR4064, Hodgdon’s Varget or Alliant Reloder 15, very good ammunition can be made to feed your .250 and provide a lifetime of hunting and shooting memories. It’s a lot of fun to head into the deer woods with an old Savage 99 just as our forefathers did. Even when ammo manufacturers quit mass producing a particular load, such as the .264 Winchester Magnum, components can still be found for reloading discontinued cartridges. Massaro Media Group and JD Fielding Photography The . "264 Winchester Magnum" The late 1950s saw Winchester release a trio of belted magnum cartridges, all based on the .375 Holland & Holland case, but shortened to fit in a .30-06 length receiver. The .458 Winchester Magnum filled the African niche created by the demise of Kynoch ammunition, and the .338 Winchester Magnum was destined to be America’s elk medicine, but the .264 was immediately a bit of a threat. It was irreverent enough to tread upon the hallowed ground ruled by the .270 Winchester. The long, lean 6.5mm bullets, when pushed through Winchester’s Westerner rifle that sported a 26-inch barrel, produced impressive velocities that could make hitting distant targets easier. The 100-grain bullets could be pushed in excess of 3,500 fps, and the 140-grain slugs hit the 3,200 fps mark. The bullets bucked the wind very well, but these speeds gave the cartridge a reputation as a barrel burner. Not long after its introduction, Winchester made the decision to shorten the barrels of the .264 rifles, and a correlative velocity reduction was the result. Often, the .264 was at or less than the velocity of the venerable .270 Winchester. By 1962, Remington released the 7mm Remington Magnum and the .264 was doomed. The shooting public loved the 7mm Magnum and turned a blind eye to the .264 Winchester. Factory ammunition is still available, in limited quantities, but few production rifles were chambered for the big 6.5mm. Related GunDigest Articles Reloading Ammo: The Precise Business of Reloading AR Cartridges Gun Digest Reloading Video Series Episode 01: Basics of Reloading Reloading Ammo: Pitfalls of Using Old Pistol Reloading Data I like to see a 26-inch barrel on a .264 to maximize the powder capacity of this case, and I like to see it fueled by the slower burning powders available today, like Reloder 22 or 25, H4831SC and IMR4350 or IMR7828. Stick a magnum rifle primer in there and you should have a recipe for success. As far as the barrel burner moniker, if you don’t heat that barrel to the point where you can light your cigar off the muzzle, it should give you a lifetime of service. Big Discontinued Cartridges: 8mm Remington Magnum The recoil of the 8mm Rem. Mag. can be stout for some shooters, but is more than capable on large, dangerous game. "Massaro Media Group" and JD Fielding Photography In 1979, Remington went out on a limb and revealed a metric designation as the new big game round in their lineup. We Americans have generally shied away from metric designations; perhaps we like the bastardized decimal portions of an inch measurement. The 8mm Magnum sounded strange, and though the name was perhaps a gamble on the popularity of the "7mm Remington Magnum" , it was not very well received. Available in the Model 700 rifle, the 8mm Magnum was a powerhouse, pushing a 220-grain bullet to almost 3,000 fps. This is a big game rifle, but alas, the .338 Winchester had enough time to spread roots, and trying to upset that apple cart would not be easy. However, those who used the 8mm Remington had great success, and its followers are fervent over this cartridge. I’ve spoken with some very big names in the shooting and hunting world that have come to love this metric oddball. Using a bullet of 180, 200 or 220 grains, this cartridge makes a great choice for elk, moose, bear or bison in North America and really shines on the African game fields. Top it with a premium bonded-core bullet and you’ll avoid premature bullet break up, and get the deep penetration and energy transfer we are all after. It is a bit on the heavy side for deer, but has put its fair share of venison in the freezer.

[How-To] Rack a Pistol Slide With Weak Hands

Trending: Best Places to Buy Ammo Online and [Buyer's Guide] 7 Best AR-15s Have you ever felt like a fragile flower because you had trouble racking the slide on your semi-automatic handgun? Do you pass your weapon off to your boyfriend/brother/husband/grandson when you need to rack the slide? Worried you won’t have time to do that in a real self-defense situation? (Hint: You won’t.) “Excuse me Mr. Violent Rapist, could you hold on just a second while I call my boyfriend to come rack this slide for me?” How to rack a slide midline Thankfully, there is a secret to racking a slide for those of us with weak hands, and it doesn’t involve hitting the free weights at the gym. It’s all about technique. Not muscle. If you’re sporting a semi-auto pistol and having a hard time snatching that slide all the way to the rear, keep reading. We’ve got some tips to help you rack your sidearm like a badass, even if you have weak hands. Table of Contents Loading... You Don’t Need to Hit the Gym You don’t need man hands and big biceps to rack the slide on your handgun. It actually takes very little muscle when you do it right. There are plenty of shooters with man hands and big biceps that are doing it wrong. The difference between them and us (Yes. I have felt like a fragile flower, too) is they have enough upper body strength to muscle their way through it. Leg day? Never heard of it. We don’t. The problem occurs when those big, strong guys (with plenty of testosterone on their side) pass their pistols to their sister/wife/girlfriend/grandma. Unfortunately, they can’t walk her through the process of racking the slide because they don’t know the proper technique. When she can’t muscle the slide back like they do, the guys chalk it up to weak hands or bird arms. While it may seem funny to you big guys, it leaves those poor girls feeling inadequate, helpless, and incapable of handling a modern pistol. Don’t worry, ladies (or anyone else with weak hands). We’ve got you covered. Someone broke into the wrong house. Here is a step by step breakdown of the proper technique for racking a slide. Practice up, and you’ll be racking that slide like a pro in no time. Proper Technique for Racking a Slide The secret to racking the slide on your pistol is to focus on pushing the weapon with your dominant hand rather than pulling the slide with your weaker side. Sounds counterintuitive, doesn’t it? Trust me. Just follow these simple steps: Step 1 Grasp the handgun firmly by the grip using your firing hand. Keep your finger off the trigger and the muzzle pointed in a safe direction. Step 2 Place the heel of your support hand on the slide serrations and wrap your fingers over the slide. Grasp the serrations on the opposite side with the four fingers of your support hand. Do not cover the ejection port. Firm grip Step 3 While holding the slide firmly, punch the firing hand forward. This isn’t the time to be dainty. The movement should be fast, strong, and forceful…like a good old-fashioned bar room punch. Although you may pull the slide back slightly as you punch, the focus should be on punching the gun forward (or slightly angled to the side), not pulling the slide back. Punch it! Step 4 Once the slide reaches its rearmost position, let it go. Don’t ride the slide forward or with your support hand. Just let the spring do its job. I promise it doesn’t need your help. Riding or following the slide forward can cause a frustrating jam. Other Tips and Tricks If you’re still having trouble racking the slide even after following these steps, here are a few other convenient tips and tricks. Don’t be Afraid of Your Gun These weapons definitely deserve a healthy dose of respect, but I’ve seen far too many newbies handle their sidearm with nothing but their fingertips. It’s like they think the firearm might reach out and slap them if they aren’t gentle. It’s okay to handle your weapon with some authority. If you don’t feel very authoritative, fake it ‘til you make it. I promise you aren’t going to break your pistol. Those things are designed to withstand an internal explosion that produces internal pressures of somewhere near 27,000 psi every time you fire a shot (and that’s if you’re shooting standard 9mm). A little hand pressure isn’t going to cause your pistol to crumble in your fingers. Keep It Close Humans are naturally stronger at their midline, so pull your pistol in toward your belly button to harness more essential muscle strength. Also, make sure not to flare your elbows out to the side. Keep them tucked close to your body. At your midline for strength! Use Your Shoulder Still having trouble? Lean forward slightly and point your shoulder as you throw that punch with your dominant hand. You can also think about punching downward at an angle rather than straight out in front of you. Safety First It’s easy to get caught up in the goal of racking the slide and in the process get careless with gun safety. Consider this a friendly reminder to always play it safe. Muzzle Safety Resist the temptation to wrench the muzzle in unsafe ways. It’s easier to punch the pistol at an angle to the side than it is to punch it straight out in front of your body. This keeps the pistol close to your body, so you can harness some extra core body strength. However, fellow shooters on the firing line don’t usually take kindly to muzzles pointed in their direction. If you need to use this motion to rack the slide, turn your body sideways in your shooting lane, so the muzzle is always pointing safely downrange. Finger Off the Trigger Keep that booger picker indexed along the pistol’s frame, well away from the trigger. You want it high and out of the way. Finger on the trigger only when you’re ready to fire! As you strongly squeeze the slide with your support hand, your natural instinct is to also squeeze the gun with your shooting hand, which could cause you to subconsciously slip that finger into the trigger guard and pull. This is called the sympathetic grip reflex, and it is seriously “no bueno.” The best way to prevent it from happening is to keep that trigger finger high up on the frame and well away from the trigger. Don’t Cover the Ejection Port The ejection port is the part of your pistol that all that hot brass comes flying out of when you shoot. Ejection port flinging hot brass out of a Sterling SMG Never cover the ejection port with your hand. Covering the port can trap a spent casing and prevent the chamber from being emptied when you rack the slide. This can cause a frustrating malfunction. Even worse…you could be struggling with the slide and accidentally punch a primer causing the case to split (This is admittedly rare but not outside the realm of possibilities). When the round detonates in the palm of your hand, it will cause an awful mess of blood and tissue that will really piss off your friendly neighborhood range safety officer. Parting Shots If you still find yourself struggling even after following our tips, keep practicing. I promise it gets easier over time. Not only will practice help you master the technique, it also helps loosen up the pistol’s recoil spring. Newer pistols have stiffer, stronger springs. With use, these springs tend to loosen up, making it easier to rack the slide. Owning and carrying a firearm is a huge responsibility, and shooters need to be able to operate their weapon self-sufficiently. Follow our tips and you’ll be racking the slide like a rockstar in no time. Have you ever had trouble racking the slide on your pistol? Did these tips make it easier? Do you have any tips of your own? Hit us up in the comments. Looking for some handgun recommendations for women (that don’t involve copious amounts of pink)? Check out our 7 Best Handguns for Women . Just some of the Best Handguns!

My Rifle as of 2013

Originally when I started this blog my rifle (and only complete weapon) was a 20 inch mashup. It had an A1 length stock and was strictly irons. Since shooting it more and going to a few competitions here and there, I started revising my rifle to modernize it while keeping the same trouble free platform relatively unchanged. From an A1 stock I went to a Vltor A5 stock: I found even the fixed stock A1 too long for any type of body armor. It was too long. On went the A5. My CompM4 was a trade item and I really like it. A Smaller H1 would be great to reduce the weight, but for now I will take what I can get. It works very well. Eventually i would want to switch to the micro RDS. Still sticking with the LMT rear BUIS. I would eventually like to upgrade to the KAC adjustable flip up rear, but for now a Magpul BUIS would suffice and will likely be my next upgrade. At my local practical rifle competitions I am the only one running a rifle. Anyone else “that guy” at the range when they run a rifle? How does it run? So far it has only had one string of malfunctions. During a cold winter carbine event the rifle was getting several failure to feeds. I threw out a few bad magazines and switched to Pmags during the event as the Pmags have never given me trouble. Still the failure to feed was present. A fellow shooter noted that using grease in the buffer tube might be the cause of my problems as it is slowing the velocity of the carrier down through the fire cycle. Well indeed I had used some thicker lubricant (Slip 2000 EWL  ) for the rifle and it was a cold day. The theory makes sense. If the viscosity thickened enough to slow down the carrier and buffer + spring then it might not have enough momentum to chamber the round. Lesson Learned. The next trip to the range with spring weather gave me no failures of any kind. I am back to using CLP as well. Next upgrades: The rifle is configured well and my only changes will be to save weight. I want the weapon to be relate-able to everyone who might have an 20 inch rifle stuffed away in the safe or perhaps those who want to build a versatile rifle based platform… so no space gun stuff. So whats next? A compensator of some type (read: not an boutique compensator ) and a new BUIS that flips down. How has your weapon changed over the years? Junk gear that had to be thrown out to start over or more of a slow learning process? Share: Google Twitter Facebook Pinterest Reddit More Tumblr LinkedIn Pocket Email Print

Summary

In doing the research for the article I learned a few things about the “other” properties of magnified optics. Thanks to Shawn for hosting my post: A Different Look at Rifle Optics Share: Google Twitter Facebook Pinterest Reddit More Tumblr LinkedIn Pocket Email Print. .